Women’s and Children’s Health

e-Reminders for your practice

e-Reminders for your practice

A New Approach to Sending Reminders

Sending reminder recalls to patients can be a hit and miss exercise.

Letters are costly, time consuming and often don’t generate the outcomes you’re after.

e- GPS had developed an email reminder recall option that is more cost-effective and less time consuming for your practice.

e-Reminders connect with your patients in a format that is engaging an prompts an immediate call to action.

 

How e-Reminders Work 

e- Reminders cover key health promotion topics:

  • Women’s health
  • Influenza vaccines
  • Skin checks
  • Men’s health
  • Diabetes
  • Mental health reviews
  • Sexual health screening
  • Specific health topics to address your practice needs

e-Reminders feature a large online button with an option to link to:

  • Your website
  • Your online booking platform
  • Email to your reception for follow-up

 

The e-GPSolution

  • e-GPS will brand your e-Reminders with your logo, contact details and website links.
  • e-Reminders can be purchased as individual campaigns or as a package. They can also be used repeatedly by your practice so represent great value.

 

 e-Reminders, e-GPS

 

 

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Infographic: The Story of Women’s Refuges in Sydney

Infographic: The Story of Women’s Refuges in Sydney
FOLLOW THE SOS CAMPAIGN
Website for in-depth information and email/letter templates www.soswomensservices.com
Twitter @soswomensservice
Facebook @soswomensservices
SOS Crowdfunding via Pozible
Raising  funds for an ongoing SOS Campaign 
Donate Now!
To all our supporters. Each and every one of you. Thank you.

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Holiday activities for bored almost teens

Holiday activities for bored almost teens

It’s happening again, that creeping anxiety whispering quietly yet insistently “Psst…school holidays are just around the corner – what will your kids be doing THIS time…?”

Our children are not very keen on us (embarrassing parent units) organising holiday activities on their behalf. They would rather hang out at home, make a mess, eat everything in the panty, then whine about how bored they are. Historically, to avoid this level of chaos, we’ve tried the gamut of Holiday Fun (..Fun Fun!) – from 5 day Basketball Bootcamp and Spectacular Science Days (read Slime Fest with a bunch of toddlers) to Vacation Care and Pony Camp (read Deathly Boring and Hideously Expensive).

Both my partner and I run small businesses from our home office in Sydney. School holidays usually equate to either;

a) getting the hell out of the city and going camping (if we can spare the time) and then waiting for batteries/coverage to dwindle so we can have some good clean fresh air fun, or

b) going out of our minds juggling children, their friends, their screen time, our work commitments, their screen time, quoting, meetings..their screen time … and the list goes on.

So here I am again trawling through all the sparkly fun activities for active, crafty kiddly winks aged 5-9 wondering what is left for desperate parents of screen addicted almost teens.

If you’re hearing the same panic-provoking whisper and wondering aloud as you wrestle the iPhone, iPad,iPod,XBox,Playstation, Minecraft,Assassin’sCreed, Skyrim World of Warcraft, Kik, Instagram, Facebook, Vine, Smosh, YouTube, Flappybird, Cookie Clicker, DrawRider, Pixel People, Tiny Tower, Hacker mania from your eight to thirteen year old, then this list of activities for screen addicted kids could be just the ticket.

Before we go on – we apologise for the Sydney-centrism. We aim to rectify this monocultural viewpoint as we continue our important research.

BUT WE NEED YOUR HELP.

Rather than stick to Sydney-based activities only, we see this as an opportunity for you to share your local secret knowledge that might just keep our screen addicts happy – and hopefully off their screens for a minute or two – during the holidays.

Famous Poster of Uncle Sam with a top hat featuring stars and stripes, pointing at you

 

Please, for the love of any deity you wish to name, do your best and leave a comment below. Share any inside info with fellow jaded parents carers of screen-addicted kids nationwide and help to keep the hair on our heads and the panic from rising to the surface.

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Could it be Swine Flu?

Could it be Swine Flu?

March 2014: Over 100 people have been admitted to hospital with swine flu in Queensland already this year – double the number for the same period last year.

85% of influenza notifications in Queensland are H1N1 virus (swine flu). Courier Mail, 12 March, 2014 

Similarly , a swine flu pandemic has been reported in New Zealand, prompting both NZ and Australian health authorities to encourage people to have their flu shots early. International Business Times, 27 March, 2014

What is Swine Flu?

H1N1 Influenza virus is a relatively new strain of Influenza A virus – first detected in Mexico in April 2009. The H1N1 virus spread rapidly around the world and was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organisation in June 2009. H1N1 is referred to as swine flu because it contains some of the same DNA from influenza strains that infect pigs.

What are the symptoms of swine flu?

The symptoms of swine flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu:

  • fever
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • body aches
  • headaches
  • chills
  • fatigue

Some people also have diarrhoea and vomiting.

Like the flu which occurs every year, swine flu can spread from person to person via droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The droplets can also settle on objects like telephones and door knobs and can then be transferred to the nose, mouth or eyes. As swine flu is a relatively new strain of influenza A, most people haven’t come into contact with it before and are therefore not immune.

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It’s Back to School time! Healthy Kids Check

It’s Back to School time! Healthy Kids Check

What is a Healthy Kids Check?

A Healthy Kids Check is a once only health assessment carried out by a GP, practice nurse or Aboriginal Health Worker to assess the health and well being of children aged 3.5 to 5 years. This assessment is useful to assess a child’s readiness to start school.

In years gone by it was the role of the school nurse who generally checked the child’s height, weight, hearing, vision, motor skills and teeth. Sometimes a note would come home for a follow-up appointment with a relevant health service and along we’d trot to the school dentist, community speech therapist or audiologist.  Unfortunately those days are long gone. Pre-school health assessments are now the responsibility of general practice.

Healthy Kids Checks are often the domain of practice nurses. More often than not, practice nurses drive uptake of Healthy Kids Check for GPs.  A rule of thumb is that if your GP hasn’t offered a health assessment they probably won’t actively undertake a Healthy Kids Checks unless you ask. So, when your child is 3.5 or 4 years and due for their final childhood vaccination, it’s a good idea to discuss the Healthy Kids Check with your GP or practice nurse and be proactive in booking an appointment.

The Healthy Kids Check is a valuable assessment as they identify both physical and behavioural health problems before school commences. Naturally, identifying and addressing issues early supports a child’s learning in the formative school years.

As of January 2014 the Healthy Kids Check will be offered from aged 3.5 with a greater emphasis on the emotional and social wellbeing of small children. This is important because evidence suggests that detection, intervention and management of problematic behaviours at a young age can lead to vastly better outcomes for a child as they grow and develop. These assessments are designed to identify  problems such as sleep, anti-social behaviour such as biting, anxiety, depression, fussy eating, separation anxiety and ADHD. These are problems that many parents or carers assume will just go away – ‘They’ll grow out of it.’  The reality is children often don’t ‘grow out of it.’ Unsupported, many of these issues can manifest into depression, anxiety and under-preforming patterns of behaviour in children and young adults.

Don’t forget that childhood vaccinations and health assessments are now linked to the Family Tax Benefit Supplement Part A. This means that without documentation to Medicare/Social Security that your child’s vaccinations are up to date, Family Payments can be withheld. Children may not be eligible to be enrolled into pre-school or school without up-to-date vaccinations.

So take advantage of your once only Healthy Kids Check with your GP or practice nurse. Read up about it on these websites, make notes, follow up and ask questions if you are concerned about anything your child is doing. One little health check has the power to help your child for a long time to come.

Get Set 4 LIfe Healthy Kids Check Animated Characters Happily Playing

Is your child starting big school this year? Make sure they have a Healthy Kids Check
Get Set 4 LIfe

Read more about The Healthy Kids Check

Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (Victoria)

Download the Get Set 4 Life Habits For Healthy Kids Guide 

 

Follow

Australian Government Department of Education @Eduspokesperson

Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria @deecd

 

 

 

 

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Recognising Eating Disorders – Part 2

Recognising Eating Disorders – Part 2

Before you start reading about how to recognise the warning signs of Eating Disorders (ED), we encourage you to skip back to Part 1 – Christmas Stress & Eating Disorders to learn more about ED including common ED triggers.

 

DO YOU NEED HELP NOW? Call the Eating Disorders Helpline: 1800 33 4673

 

Recognising Eating Disorder Warning Signs

There are physical, psychological and behavioural warning signs that can signal the onset or the presence of an eating disorder and it is common for someone to display a combination of these symptoms.

It is important to be aware of the following:

Physical warning signs

  • Rapid weight loss or frequent changes in weight
  • Loss of or disturbance of menstrual periods in girls and women
  • Fainting or dizziness
  • Always feeling tired and not sleeping well
  • Swelling around the cheeks or jaw, calluses on knuckles, damage to teeth and bad breath which can be signs of vomiting
  • Feeling cold most of the time, even in warm weather

Psychological warning signs

  • Preoccupation with eating, food, body shape and weight
  • Feeling anxious around meal times
  • Feeling ‘out of control’ around food
  • Having a distorted body image
  • Feeling obsessed with body shape, weight and appearance
  • ‘Black and white’ thinking – rigid thoughts about food being ‘good’ or ‘bad’
  • Changes in emotional and psychological state – depression, stress, anxiety, irritability, low self esteem
  • Using food as a source of comfort (e.g. eating as a way to deal with boredom, stress or depression)
  • Using food as self punishment (e.g. refusing to eat due to depression, stress or other emotional reasons)

Behavioural warning signs

  • Dieting behaviour (e.g. fasting, counting calories/kilojoules, avoiding food groups such as fats and carbohydrates)
  • Eating in private and avoiding meals with other people
  • Evidence of binge eating (e.g. disappearance of large amounts of food)
  • Frequent trips to the bathroom during or shortly after meals
  • Vomiting or using laxatives, enemas or diuretics
  • Changes in clothing style (e.g. wearing baggy clothes)
  • Compulsive or excessive exercising (e.g. exercising in bad weather, in spite of sickness, injury or social events; and experiencing distress if exercise is not possible)
  • Making lists of good or bad foods
  • Suddenly disliking food they have always enjoyed in the past
  • Obsessive rituals around food preparation and eating (e.g. eating very slowly, cutting food into very small pieces, insisting that meals are served at exactly the same time everyday)
  • Extreme sensitivity to comments about body shape, weight, eating and exercise habits
  • Secretive behaviour around food (e.g. saying they have eaten when they haven’t, hiding uneaten food in their rooms)

It is important to remember that due to the nature of an eating disorder some of these characteristic behaviours may be concealed.

Source:  NEDC National Eating Disorders Collaboration 

 

DO YOU NEED HELP NOW? Call the Eating Disorders Helpline: 1800 33 4673

 

ED and the internet

For the sake of balance, it’s important to mention that there are groups on the internet that actively encourage negative eating behaviours. Some people with ED use social media forums, blogs, photos and  “thinspiration” to encourage, laud and form an ED alliance where ED is discussed and where negative behaviours are reinforced. Initially, these sites were a kick against the system where censorship and punitive, conventional treatment methods were simply not working. The danger of such sites is that fasts, starvation, over-exercising and dangerous dysfunctional behaviour is very often celebrated and encouraged. People living with ED, their families and health professionals should be aware that these sites exist and form strategies around how to deal with insidious messages that encourage negative behaviours and practices and the emotions or behaviours that these messages may trigger.

 

Useful Links

More tips for coping with Christmas: Eating Disorders Victoria

The Butterfly Foundation Support for Australians experiencing eating disorders

NEDC National Eating Disorders Collaboration 

Derwent House Eating Disorders Day Program NSW FedupNSW

 

Follow

@ButterflyFoundation

@SupportMeAndYou

@Centre4EatDis

@NEDC_Australia

@FedupNSW 

Sources

Paying the Price: The economic and social impact of eating disorders in Australia. Butterfly Report, 2012. Download The Butterfly Report 

American Association of Suicidology. Suicide and Eating Disorders. Downloaded from LIFE  livingisforeveryone.com.au

Eating Disorders Victoria www.eatingdisorders.org.au

Eating Disorders Victoria Helpline: 1300 550 326

National Eating Disorders Collaboration NEDC

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Christmas Stress & Eating Disorders – Part 1

Christmas Stress & Eating Disorders – Part 1

Christmas can be an especially difficult time for all people who live with mental illness. For people with eating disorders (ED), the bells and whistles of Christmas and large family gatherings make the battle with food more visible to extended family and friends. Hypervigilance and high anxiety can easily lead to misunderstandings, judgement and conflict. Families may find themselves isolated at Christmas time, simply because hosting a Christmas lunch is extraordinarily difficult when someone with an eating disorder is sitting at the table.

The build up to Christmas typically involves increasing anxiety around traditional celebrations involving food. There may a heightened fear of putting on weight for people with anorexia, secret preparations and purging for people with bulimia nervosa or guilt, shame and trauma for people who have binge eating disorder. Afterwards there is the fallout of the festive season which can involve relapses, crash dieting, depression, isolation, even suicide. Naturally, this means that eating and drinking traditional Christmas fare strikes a morbid fear in the hearts and minds of many thousands of Australians.

It is estimated that there are over 913,000 people in Australia with eating disorders and the impact of an eating disorder is much like other significant mental illness –  the burden of illness falls firmly onto the shoulders of families and friends. This is particularly true in the case of eating disorders because there are so few hospital beds allocated for patients with eating disorders – The Butterfly Foundation estimate the nationwide bed allocation for people with ED is just twenty two. Twenty two beds across Australia allocated for people suffering from an often fatal mental illness. Needless to say, the waiting lists for these beds are sometimes years long (and very often years too late…).

  • Eating disorders can be fatal, in fact one in ten people with anorexia nervosa will not survive for more than 10 years after the onset of the illness.
  • In 2012 there were an estimated 1,863 deaths in Australia due to eating disorders (gender differences: 515 males, 1313 females).

Comorbidities such as anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation are common for people living with eating disorders. Suicide mortality rates in people with anorexia nervosa are one of the highest of all psychiatric illnesses with the risk of death by suicide in people with anorexia nervosa calculated as high as 57 to 58 times that of the same age and gender and populations.

 

DO YOU NEED HELP NOW? CALL THE ED SUPPORT LINE: 1800 33 4673

 

5 Common Eating Disorder Triggers

So, what are some of the triggers someone with an eating disorder might be experiencing at this time of year?

Eating disorder triggers vary from person to person but common triggers include:

  • Emotional issues – Disordered eating is a way to cope with painful or distressing emotions (anger, sadness, frustration, helplessness)
  • Weight comments – “You look so much better now – how has your weight been?” or “Wow, you’re looking well!
  • Images – models, skinny people, pictures of food, recipes, cooking programs on TV
  • Eating with others – Some people who are living with ED report that eating with other people makes them feel like a “pig”. No matter how much is on their plate, it seems like much more that everyone else has.
  • Exercise promotion – When super fit models or personal trainers claim that “diet and fitness go hand-in-hand” it can be a trigger for people with ED. Over exercising is common in people living with anorexia and while the “Exercise to beat obesity” message is great for many people, it can be a dangerous trigger for ED sufferers.

 

Read more on Recognising the Warning Signs of Eating Disorders 

 

Coping with ED during the Festive Season

So, how can people with ED and their families prepare for this season of overindulgence?

  • Plan ahead: Identify a support person and talk to them about your fears and concerns. Ask them to be available for you or your family to contact in case you feel overwhelmed.
  • Be prepared for tensions to escalate around Christmas Day or before a party. Communicate as clearly and calmly as possible.
  • Take time out for yourself. Plan for your family to do something together that is relaxing and does not necessarily revolve around food. A walk on the beach or in the park, a swim, listening to music, playing a game together.
  • Avoid comments about appearance – try something like “It’s great to see you here” or “Lovely that you could make it today”
  • Set realistic New Year resolutions with healthy boundaries
  • Learn to set realistic goals for yourself and your family. If taking on too much is going to stress you out – say NO!
  • Say YES to a healthy body image

Remember, Christmas can be a tough time for many people. Christmas will never be a “perfect day”, so learn to relax about Christmas, lower the bar, and if things don’t turn out as planned, it isn’t the end of the world. Christmas is but one day. Tomorrow is another day and there are many more tomorrows to come…..

 

DO YOU NEED HELP NOW? CALL THE ED SUPPORT LINE: 1800 33 4673

 

The Dangers of Unofficial Websites

It’s important to mention there are groups on the internet that actively encourage negative eating behaviours. Some people with ED use social media forums, blogs, photos and  “thinspiration” to encourage, laud and form an ED alliance where ED is discussed and where negative behaviours are reinforced. Initially, these sites were a kick against the system where censorship and punitive, conventional treatment methods were simply not working. The danger of such sites is that fasts, starvation, over-exercising and dangerous dysfunctional behaviour is very often celebrated and encouraged. People living with ED, their families and health professionals should be aware that these sites exist and form strategies around how to deal with insidious messages that encourage negative behaviours and practices and the emotions or behaviours that these messages may trigger.

 

Useful Links

More tips for coping with Christmas: Eating Disorders Victoria

The Butterfly Foundation Support for Australians experiencing eating disorders

NEDC National Eating Disorders Collaboration 

Derwent House NSW 

Follow

@ButterflyFoundation

@SupportMeAndYou

@Centre4EatDis

@NEDC_Australia

 @FedUpNSW

Sources

Paying the Price: The economic and social impact of eating disorders in Australia. Butterfly Report, 2012. Download The Butterfly Report 

American Association of Suicidology. Suicide and Eating Disorders. Downloaded from LIFE  livingisforeveryone.com.au

Eating Disorders Victoria www.eatingdisorders.org.au

Eating Disorders Victoria Helpline: 1300 550 326

National Eating Disorders Collaboration NEDC

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What You Should Know About Sun Damage

What You Should Know About Sun Damage

Gotta love Summer for its bright, sparkling days, warm nights, beachtime and bare skin. But what about the harmful effect of the sun?

What is sun damage?

Sun damage is what happens to your skin when it is exposed to the sun over a prolonged period of time. In Australia, sun damage is common1 and presents itself through a variety of different symptoms.2

How does sun damage occur?

Sun damage can occur when your skin has been exposed to the sun over a prolonged period of time.2 While spending as little as 15 minutes in the Australian sun can cause sunburn,3 sun damage is cumulative and can take years to appear as visible symptoms.2, 3 This means that any sun burn or sun exposure experienced when you were a child or teenager may not appear as visible sun damage until you are well into middle and even older age.

How does sun damage appear?

The effects of sun damage on your skin and overall wellbeing can vary depending on the level of sun exposure you have had, your skin type, your age and a variety of other factors. Sun damage may appear as cosmetic change on your skin, such as a wrinkle or discolouration or as a textural change where an area of your skin begins to feel, rough, scaly or hardened.2,4 Sun damage can also progress as a much more serious condition, like skin cancer.3

It is important to understand that sun damage may not be seen on your skin until many years after the initial sun exposure has occurred.2,3 As a result, it is important that you get to know your own skin so you can learn to identify possible areas of sun damage and bring them to the attention of your doctor as early as possible.

What are sun spots?

Solar keratoses, or sun spots as they are more commonly known, are skin lesions that develop as a result of exposure to the sun’s UV rays.2,6

Sunspots can vary in size – from as small as a few millimetres up to two centimetres across – and may be scaly, rough or wart like in their appearance.2,6 The colour of sun spots varies, from a barely noticeable darkening in skin colour to a more obvious red colour.2,6 They are common on areas of the skin that are regularly exposed to the sun, particularly on the nose, cheeks, upper lip, temple, ears, forehead, neck and hands.2,6

In Australia, sunspots are particularly common in fair-skinned people and in those who have spent long periods of time outdoors without protecting their skin.2,6 Sunspots can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).6 In patients with more than 10 sunspots, there is a 10-15 per cent chance of the patient developing a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).6 As a result, sun spots are generally treated for health reasons.6 People with sunspots should get them examined by a doctor on a regular basis.6

Will using sunscreen protect me from sun damage?

It is important to protect yourself from the sun as much as possible. This can be achieved by using a high factor (30+) sunscreen, wearing protective clothing and seeking shade.5 While using sunscreen will allow you to stay in the sun longer without getting burned, long-term exposure to the sun still causes sun damage, which may lead to skin cancer if not monitored and managed.2,6 It is not known which areas of sun damage will turn into skin cancer so it is important to check all sun spots regularly for any changes and talk to your GP if you notice any changes.6, 7

Who should I speak to if I suspect I have sun damage?

Your GP is the best person to talk to since he/she can look to see if you have sun damage. There are effective treatments that can be used. Your practice nurse or local pharmacist may also be able to provide advice. If you have several sunspots or your GP suspects you have skin cancer, you may be referred to a dermatologist for further investigation and treatment.

What is the Know Your Own Skin campaign?

Know Your Own Skin is a health education campaign designed to help raise awareness of the long-term consequences of repeated sun exposure and the need to identify sun damage early. The campaign encourages Australians to start thinking about past sun damage and the impact it may have on their skin now or in the future, and to speak to their GP if they notice anything unusual.

How is this any different to other skin cancer and sun protection campaigns?

Slip Slap Slop the Cancer Council Australia’s campaign has been highly successful over the past 30 years in raising awareness of the need to protect skin from the sun, with a particular focus on children and teenagers. However, as many people over the age of 40 lived in the pre-Slip Slap Slop era, enjoying time in the strong Australian sunshine with minimal protection, the damage to their skin has already been done.

Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer before the age of 70.8 Yet despite this, recent research revealed only three in ten Australians over the age of 40 get annual skin checks.9 This suggests there may be a large awareness ‘gap’ around the long-term effects of sun burn/exposure. Know Your Own Skin is a health education campaign that addresses this awareness ‘gap’. It has been designed to help raise awareness of the long-term consequences of repeated sun exposure and highlights to Australians the need to identify sun damage early.

Further Information

Visit www.knowyourownskin.com

Email enquiries@knowyourownskin.com

Download the Know Your Own Skin App

References

1. Quaedvlieg et al 2006. 2. http://www.cancervic.org.au/about-cancer/cancer_types/skin_cancers_non_melanoma#sunspots. 3. http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/sunburn_explained. 4. http://www.dermnet.org.nz/site-age-specific/ageing.html. 5. Welsh 2004. 6. http://www.dermnet.org.nz/lesions/solar-keratoses.html. 7. Feldman SR et al. Progression of Actinic Keratosis to Squamous Cell Carcinoma Revisited: Clinical Implications. CUTIS 2011; 87: 201-207. 8. http://www.health.gov.au/internet/skincancer/publishing.nsf/Content/fact-2. 9. Kantar Health 2010.

This blog post has been adapted from Know Your Own Skin Media Centre

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Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids

Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids

This week, we welcome Guest Blogger Stephanie Azri – Clinical Social Worker and Author of ‘Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids’

In my work as a clinical social worker, and despite the validity of the current research, I noticed that teachers and parents did not always have the time or opportunity to teach their children the necessary life skills to overcome all the stressors and traumas of life.

A minority of children with, or at risk of, substantial issues were adequately prioritised to receive clinical support. However, a larger number of children with what may be considered ‘routine’ issues, some of whom lacked confidence, communication or positive-thinking skills, were not screened and consequently not supported – they were not clinically ‘depressed’ or ‘oppositional’.

The concept that resilience should be regarded as a preventative notion, teaching fundamental building blocks of skills in a systematic way to all children in routine settings, stood out to me as a current gap. Indeed, resilience building is important for the healthy development of children in the middle years. With a lack of local and affordable services for children with ‘routine’ issues, a new program was released in February 2013. Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers and trialled in Logan, Brisbane and Gold Coast since 2011, ‘Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids’ has finally become a resource accessible to any practitioner working with children, parents and carers.

The ‘Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids’ program addresses the issues of resilience in children aged 9-14. Issues such as:

  • self-esteem
  • communication skills
  • positive thinking
  • healthy friendships
  • dealing with anger, stress, anxiety & grief

These crucial resilience skills being taught to children over ten modules. The program comes complete with session plans, worksheets, activity guides, session summaries and superhero comic books to illustrate each skill taught. This imaginative resource is a complete program ideal for teachers, GPs, psychologists, OTs, nurses, therapists, social workers and youth workers working or wanting to work on resilience building with children.

Healthy Mindsets for Super Kids can be ordered from any online bookstore.

For more information or to view a video trailer of the program visit the author’s website

 www.stephanieazri.com

 

 

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