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Infection Protection Review

Infection Protection Review

OK, so as promised in our previous blog from the #WorldSTICongress2015, we had our in-house gamers review the new STI game developed by WA Health Infection Protection. 

Introducing Gamer 1: At 14 years old, this gamer has had 12 years gaming experience. Starting out at 2 playing Freddie Fish, he moved into Star Wars Lego games at 6, loved Mario Kart, built hundreds of architecturally designed cities in Minecraft (still a gold favourite) peppering these games with bouts of Team Fortress 2 and FIFA, until he discovered Assassins Creed and shoot-em-up games like Call of Duty.

The game has a really good concept. I like how they’ve integrated Minecraft a popular and well known video game into something that educates children about STIs and health. It’s pretty funny at first, because everyone is having sex and that’s a bit weird. I’ve never seen Minecraft people having sex before. This made me laugh but it could make some people feel uncomfortable.  After a while you get used to it and then you realise that it’s actually quite serious that the more sex they have the more diseases they can get.

You feel you’re responsible for these people having sex and spreading diseases as quickly as they do. So you have to stop the spread of disease by giving them safe sex packs and treating them. 

Sending them to the clinic to get tested is really good because you learn about the symptoms and the treatments that are available.

The only thing is that you can’t really tell if the person has symptoms - but they should still go to the clinic to get tested just in case they just caught something from the last person they had sex with.

The way the game could be improved would be to give the characters more personality. Perhaps a picture of them (avatar) and a description eg; Brown hair, blue eyes, likes girls, likes boys, likes both, only has sex with one person, has lots of sex, has symptoms, has no symptoms. Make it more personal. You have to take care of them so you might as well know who they are. 

Introducing Gamer 2: At 12, this gamer likes to play SIMS, Minecraft, Super Mario Bros, Nintendogs, Wii Sports, Kitty Powers Match Maker. She is an app queen with an iPhone and an attitude.

It’s weird for a 12 year old to see Minecraft characters doing that with each other. We still haven’t had “The Talk” at school but my Mum has told me about all that stuff. I know it’s normal, but it’s still weird. I like the way it looks like Minecraft. The graphics were pretty good. I played for a while and treated some people at the Clinic but I got bored after a while. I didn’t really want to learn about sex and diseases so I stopped playing. I don’t think I’d play again unless the characters were more interesting. Maybe if they had pets or did other stuff.

Infection Protection

 

Play Infection Protection by going to www.getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au

 

get the facts

Download Infection Protection from www.getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au

 

 

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Get Your Game On!

Get Your Game On!

Turning the corner, I braced myself for another unfathomably academic abstract with a title that reads something like Engineering Human Rhinovirus Serotype A-1 as an HIV Vaccine Vector. My poor overloaded brain just wasn’t able to cope with another poster of stats, graphs and nanotype. So imagine the relief when I turned the corner to find the complete opposite. Here, at the World STI Congress 2015, was a research group who had finally got their game on.

Infection Protection, an initiative from the WA Health Department, are using online gaming to get their Sexual Health messages out to the young (and the young at heart). You can check out Infection Protection by downloading it from www.getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au

Interactive Games Missing their Mark

Interactive games are playing an increasingly important role in education around health and social issues. Check out this list compiled by MedlinePlus to see how much of an influence health games are playing. While the intentions are good, the majority of health games miss their mark. Kids are so much more tech savvy than we realise and in the time it takes to develop and build a game, it’s easy to lose them if the game is lame. Yes, the intentions are good - but are they really reaching their target audience?

Cashing in on the Minecraft Model

Infection Protection appears to have hit their target by channelling the one game that has completely captured kid’s imaginations, Minecraft. Millions of young people from 2-22 are playing Minecraft - the global gaming phenomena that uses blockhead characters to build cities, worlds and galaxies. You can play online with other Minecrafters from across the globe, or offline if you have the demo game.

Infection Protection is a simple game but, from our perspective, the branding is spot on. And, just to be sure, we’re going to ask our 12-14 year old audience to review the game.

Stay tuned for an honest appraisal next week!

PS: We tried to download from the App Store but had a few issues, so we went to Get The Facts and found a whole bunch of other really great sexual health messages for young people.

Download Infection Protection from www.getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au

 

get the facts

Download from www.getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au

#WorldSTICongress2015  #AUSHIVAIDS2015

 

 

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